Is Your Olive Oil Real or Fake?

Olive Tree

Do you have any idea where your olive oil comes from? What country and more specifically, what region? Does it come from a small, locally owned business or a large corporation?

Do you know how your olive oil is made? Is it pure, 100% olive oil or is soybean and/or perhaps canola oil added? How fresh are the olives? Were they picked and then pressed the same day or a few weeks later? How are the olives grown? How rich is the soil where the crops are planted?

Does your olive oil come in a clear glass container or darker glass? Does it sit on the shelves in the grocery stores in the light?

All these questions matter.

Unfortunately, the olive oil you consume is probably not real. Extra virgin means nothing. There is no regulation with this label in the United States. As long as the oil inside the bottle is a little “extra virgin” then it can be labeled as so.

A similar example is how all cows are “grass-fed.” Every single cow is fed some grass. However, most beef comes from cows that spend most of their life in a CAFO.

In general, the food industry does not give a shit about quality. Instead, they care about quantity. How can you sell more bottles of olive oil at cheap costs so you can earn a bigger profit? How do you fatten up animals before slaughter so they produce more meat allowing for a greater profit?

Know your food. It’s extremely important.

Listen to the Balanced Bites Podcast – Episode 33

I just finished listening to episode 33 of the Balanced Bites podcast. It’s only 30 minutes long so go give it a listen. At the end there is a generous 25% off discount code available to you for 100% pure, real olive oil from Greece. Learn more about the olive oil at Kasandrinos.com.

You’ll learn more about olive oil and why it is so important to know the source. Why buying cheap olive oil is just like throwing dollar bills in the trash.

Educate yourself about something that you probably consume on a regular basis.

How can you tell if your olive oil is real or fake?

According to Sally Fallon from her Nourishing Traditions lecture, if you place your olive oil in your refrigerator overnight (give it 10+ hours) and it turns solid then it is real. If it remains a liquid then it’s fake.

I completed this test with the Kirkland Signature olive oil. This olive oil is first cold pressed. Apparently this doesn’t mean a damn thing. The oil remained a liquid. I was not one bit surprised but a little sad.

I don’t know if this trick will work 100% of the time. Thus, I am not certain that the Costco’s brand olive oil is fake. But, I am definitely skeptical. It’s outrageously cheap which is not a good sign. It sits on the shelves in the light for hours on end as well. It does not taste the best either.

Have you ever tasted real, pure olive oil? It is amazing. You can actually drink the stuff. Olive oil shots.

A lot of local olive oil from California may be legit. Do the refrigerator test and take a shot of the olive oil. Be honest with yourself about the taste. Think about the texture and flavor.

I am not an expert on olive oil by any means, but who knows, maybe someday I will become one. It’s unfortunate that we have a sick food industry here in the “greatest country in the world.” But it is what it is.

More and more people are becoming aware of real, whole food. However, the last I knew, we continue to get sicker and sicker.

What are your thoughts on olive oil?

What brand of olive oil do you enjoy? Is it 100% real, pure olive oil? How do you know? Are you surprised by the truth behind olive oil? I’d love to know all of your thoughts. Just leave a comment below!

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  1. […] oil. If you are not sure of the quality or source, do some research. Check out this post from Primal Toad on how to determine if your olive oil is real or fake. I get mine from Kasandrinos Imports. […]